A Temporary Internet

Nothing is certain on the internet.

Link rot is a perpetual problem with the internet. We all have experienced plenty of occasions where a promising link turns out to be a ‘404’. There is something of a transient nature about the internet. Items can be moved. Servers crash. Domains are abandoned. Articles are lost. Nothing really is certain.

Another layer of certainty that probably needs to be reviewed is the uncertainty regarding link shortening services. This was highlighted recently by an announcement by Bitly.com that they are going to be retiring their link bundling service. This particular feature has apparently not been an overwhelming hit and the company has decided to retire the service rather than keep it up.

This particular feature may not interest you at all…but what about if Bitly goes out of business? What if link shortening becomes a thing of the past and not longer is relevant. Think of the countless tweets, posts, and services that rely on link shortening (and Bitly isn’t the only one). All those ‘links’ will suddenly become a massive pile of rot that barring some interference from the Internet Archive or some other concerned non-profit will be irreversible.

Perhaps we should give some thought as to how we are building the internet and avoid sacrificing convenience or length so that we are building an internet of lasting value.

Further Reading:

Getting Started With SVG

SVG allows for fantastic scalability and the source code behind the images is actually xml and editable.

SVG is a big deal. It seems to me like its becoming a bigger deal, at least, I’m running into it more often. The trend toward responsive design is probably at the root of this push. SVG allows for fantastic scalability and the source code behind the images is actually xml and editable. I ran into Steven Bradley’s blog vanseodesign.com a few weeks ago and have really profited from his tutorials on SVG. If you’re looking for a good starting point I would recommend you start here and follow along. He has a great writing style and his examples are understandable.

Mobile Browsers

Recent years have seen an increase in discussions over native apps and mobile apps. But this is not where our energies need to be spent. Our energies need to be spent with better web browsers and web designs that are friendly for mobile devices whether responsive or mobile-first.

There are two glaring deficiencies (at least!) in the mobile sphere: programmers utilizing web browsers and users demanding decent web browsers. I noticed the issue for the first time this week with a release from the Electronic Freedom Foundation for their new mobile app.

Their app is probably really good. I really like the EFF. The app has an alert system for EFF’s new campaigns. You should probably download it. You should probably donate or at least show some support for the EFF and the work they do. But do they need an app?

Let’s be clear the issue is not EFF or their app. The issue is withe the flood of apps that are being published every year for website after website. I’ve never really cared much for the issue of native vs mobile apps. Each has their supporters and frankly each probably has their own place and strengths–but what about the web page?

Continue reading “Mobile Browsers”